Early Childhood Special Education – MSEd, EdM

Discover creative ways to help young children learn and grow.

As a student in this program, you will become well-grounded in child development and its variations and develop the capacity to work in a range of settings and engage all children. This includes working with children from diverse racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and linguistic backgrounds and also includes children with a variety of social, emotional, behavioral, physical, and cognitive variations.

This program will support your understanding that learning develops through play, social interaction, and sensory experiences and will help you to implement strategies based on current research of inclusive practices.

Become A
Bank Street Teacher

You will learn to:

  • Carefully observe children and use that knowledge to guide and inform your teaching.
  • Engage all young children in play, learning, and interaction.
  • Develop a strong social justice focus in order to advocate for and with children and families.
  • Plan for dynamic and collaborative partnerships with families and school professionals.
  • Develop skill in engaging with young children of varying development in meaningful ways.

This program is for you if:

  • You are seeking your permanent teaching certification.
  • You want to work with children birth through grade 2 in general, inclusion, and/or special education settings.

This program culminates in a Master of Science in Education or a Master of Education (for those students with a prior master’s degree in education), and requires 32 credits.

Discover creative ways to help young children learn and grow.

As a student in this program, you will become well-grounded in child development and its variations and develop the capacity to work in a range of settings and engage all children. This includes working with children from diverse racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and linguistic backgrounds and also includes children with a variety of social, emotional, behavioral, physical, and cognitive variations.

This program will support your understanding that learning develops through play, social interaction, and sensory experiences and will help you to implement strategies based on current research of inclusive practices.

You will learn to:

  • Carefully observe children and use that knowledge to guide and inform your teaching.
  • Engage all young children in play, learning, and interaction.
  • Develop a strong social justice focus in order to advocate for and with children and families.
  • Plan for dynamic and collaborative partnerships with families and school professionals.
  • Develop skill in engaging with young children of varying development in meaningful ways.

This program is for you if:

  • You are seeking your permanent teaching certification.
  • You want to work with children birth through grade 2 in general, inclusion, and/or special education settings.

This program culminates in a Master of Science in Education or a Master of Education (for those students with a prior master’s degree in education), and requires 32 credits.

Become A
Bank Street Teacher

Your degree will provide you with a range of career opportunities

Required Courses for Early Childhood Special Education – MSEd, EdM

Supervised Fieldwork/Advisement

Central to a Bank Street education is the integration of coursework and field experiences as you engage and educate children based on a solid grounding in what makes children tick. Through sustained experiences in the field, supervision from core faculty, and close collaboration with peers, our graduate students develop the ability to connect theory to practice and to reflect deeply on their own growth as educators. In this program, you will:

  • Participate in a weekly collaborative conference group with your advisor and 5 to 7 other graduate students. You will have an opportunity to engage in ongoing in-depth conversations about teaching and learning.
  • Benefit from individual meetings with your advisor twice each month.
  • Attend periodic conference meetings with your Bank Street advisor and with the cooperating teacher.

There are three ways students work in classroom settings: as a student teacher (3 days each week), as a full-time assistant, or as a head teacher.

  • Student teachers complete one semester in an inclusive or special education setting.
  • Working teachers and assistants (in approved settings) may use their own classrooms for their fieldwork setting. These students may need additional experience through placement in a summer supervised fieldwork/ advisement during a July (summer 2) term.
Credit(s) 2.0   |   This course is offered as a blended or fully online course

Based on the belief that language is an essential foundation for the learning that takes place in formal and informal education, this course will look at the typical stages of language acquisition in monolingual and multilingual children. Participants will examine the various theories about language acquisition and diversity, and about the role that caregivers and teachers play in the child’s development of language. In addition, they will analyze the political, educational, social, and emotional aspects that determine the stratification of languages and dialects. A significant part of the course will deal with the ways in which students learn English as a second language and the strategies that teachers can use to help them learn the language and to fully integrate English language learners into general and special education classrooms.

Credit(s) 3.0

This course provides a framework for developing curriculum that engages all children in authentic meaning-making about themselves and their wider world. Participants use principles of child development and developmental variation as a foundation for planning experiences that support deep learning. The course focuses on curriculum as the core vehicle for affirming children’s developing identities, including cultural and linguistic identity. Using social studies as the core of an integrated curriculum, participants plan using diverse materials, modalities, content, and perspectives to help children examine big questions. Participants use universal design principles to create learning experiences that are inclusive of a broadly diverse range of learners.

Credit(s) 3.0

This course examines the impact of technology on teaching and learning. Participants will explore how new technologies can be integrated with curriculum to create access to learning for a range of learners, including students with disabilities. Through readings, class discussion, and hands-on,project-based learning experiences, students will be introduced to various technological tools. Emphasis will be placed on encouraging students to reflect on their experiences in the course, both as a learner and as a teacher, in order to understand the role of new technologies in education.

Credit(s) 2.0

In this course, participants will explore learning mathematics as a developmental process. Central emphasis will be placed on constructing an understanding of equitable mathematics education focusing on access for all learners. Through focus on an individual child, students will learn to analyze children’s strengths and examine the challenges that differences such as language ability, working memory, executive function and processing can pose to students as they work to gain conceptual understanding, factual knowledge and procedural fluency. Participants will select and develop mathematical tasks for a variety of students and will be expected to analyze students’ strengths and potential barriers to access, shaping mathematical learning experiences to meet their needs.

Credit(s) 1.0   |   This course is offered as a blended or fully online course

This course will explore autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from historical, cultural, political, and developmental lenses. It will support graduate students in thinking deeply and from multiple perspectives about the evolution of our understandings about and interventions with the broad range of characteristics of learning and development attributed to people with ASD. This course considers the significance of home and/or school as the primary sources of educational intervention and direct services for children with ASD. Participants will consider the importance of providing young children with ASD with an educational program that is responsive to each child’s unique pattern of relative strengths and vulnerabilities and will learn ways to partner in this work with a diverse range of families. Participants will explore the use of assistive technology as a tool for supporting student learning, communication, and independence.

Credit(s) 2.0   |   This course is offered as a blended or fully online course

This course is designed to increase participants’ awareness and understanding of the educational, social, cultural, linguistic and developmental implications of disability from historical, legal, and socio-political perspectives. The course will critically examine state and federal special education and disability laws and regulations and their implementation across a range of settings including their intersection with issues of race, class, language, and gender. There is an emphasis on understanding how disability is socially constructed at the levels of family, community, school, and the larger society. Participants apply an understanding of developmental variations to analyze and create accessible learning experiences for children. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or 501 or 800; or permission of instructor.

Credit(s) 1.0   |   This course is offered as a blended or fully online course

This course explores play as central to supporting the social, emotional, and cognitive development of children with varying developmental and learning variations. Participants will learn a variety of therapeutic play techniques that promote self-regulation, self-esteem, and emotional expression, and development across domains. This course is appropriate for general and special education teachers, parents, caregivers, child life specialists, social workers, therapists, and counselors. Participants are required to have prior coursework focused on child development and on developmental variations.

Credit(s) 2.0

This course examines communication, language, and literacy as they emerge in monolingual and multilingual children from infancy through early childhood. Participants examine how language, socialization, communicative competence, and literacy develop within, and are impacted by, children’s sociocultural contexts. Participants are introduced to communication disorders and other learning variations of the early years that affect language and literacy learning. Specific practices are identified to enhance the experience of young children who are receiving services in school as English language learners. Modifications and adaptations to support children with learning variations are explored. Prerequisite: EDUC 500 or EDUC 800. Pre- or Co-requisite: EDUC 505.

Credit(s) 2.0

This course introduces and explores informal and formal assessment practices for young children. Students will learn about various ways of observing, collecting, documenting, and analyzing children’s work and learning experiences in a variety of settings. Students will also become familiar with formal and informal assessment procedures and terminology, standardized testing, and strategies for test selection to ensure results that are valid and unbiased. Students will also examine legal, ethical, culturally responsive, and professional considerations of assessment. Students will be given practical experience in the preparation and administration of different forms of assessment, including the construction of simple performance assessments. Critical attention will be given to careful interpretation and utilization of assessment data in developing meaningful curriculum and educational plans for individual children. Culturally responsive approaches to assessment and involving the family with the assessment process will also be addressed. Prerequisites: EDUC 803 or EDUC 894.

Credit(s) 2.0

Early Childhood Practicum I and II is a year-long course that provides graduate students the opportunity to integrate theory and practice as they work with a child and family. Practicum I focuses on: 1) observation as the foundation of early childhood assessment and 2) culturally sustaining, family-based practice. Participants learn to observe and record children’s behavior in home, school, and community settings. Through regular observations, participants construct a respectful and increasingly complex understanding of the child within his/her sociocultural context. Special emphasis is placed on recognizing the strengths of the child and family. Participants develop greater awareness of their own perspectives and the ways their personal experiences affect what they notice and how they interpret their observations. Participants begin to integrate adult development, family systems theory, and cultural/linguistic diversity as a basis for developing relationships with the child’s family. This work provides a foundation for Practicum II. Prerequisites EDUC 500 or EDUC 800; and EDUC 803.

Credit(s) 2.0

This course completes a year-long sequence of work with a child and the child’s family. The focus in the second semester is two-fold: 1) developing a responsive collaboration with the family and 2) developing and analyzing the use of a range of instructional strategies. Through conversations, participants learn about the family’s perspectives and goals. To gather further data, participants select, develop, and use a variety of informal assessments. Participants apply their developing knowledge of the child’s interests and developmental needs as they design and implement instructional strategies. The course engages participants in a deep understanding of the assessment, planning and instruction cycle as they collect data and reflect on their instruction and apply their learnings in their ongoing work with the child and family. Participants will work with families to jointly plan goals as they develop their understandings of the IEP/IFSP. Prerequisite: EDUC 894.

Credit(s) 6.0

Fieldwork in appropriate settings with supervision and advisement. Candidates in advisement participate in weekly small-group conferences with their advisor. These seminars include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory with practice. Attention is given to instructional strategies for addressing the individual academic and behavioral strengths and needs of typically and atypically developing children within classroom settings. Opportunities to collaborate and co-teach with cooperating teachers and other school personnel are an integral part of the course.

Credit(s) 3.0

This course is designed for candidates in the early childhood special education certification programs who are working teachers or assistant teachers. Its purpose is to give candidates a supervised teaching experience within the range of ages, settings, and student characteristics required by New York State that cannot be met through their full-time teaching positions. During July, candidates are placed in an appropriate site for four weeks, five days per week. Advisors visit them in their sites and meet with candidates individually. There are weekly conference groups with candidates and advisors that will include the exchange and analysis of ongoing professional experiences and provide a forum for integrating theory and practice.

Credit(s) 0.0   |   This course is offered as a blended or fully online course

Anyone applying for certification after February 2, 2001 must complete two hours of training on school violence prevention and intervention. This workshop includes training in effective classroom management techniques, identifying the warning signs of violent and other troubling behavior, and intervention techniques for resolving violent incidents in the school. (Offered only to matriculated students.)

Credit(s) 0.0   |   This course is offered as a blended or fully online course

All adults working with children under eighteen years of age are required by NY State law to report suspected child abuse and neglect. This course will help you learn to identify symptoms of child abuse and neglect and will provide you with information about the required procedures for reporting abuse. (Only offered to matriculated students.)